Sinepearl

Sinepearl dwells in the new age zone of ambient dance music - that is, ambience that has some roots in techno, trance, breaks and/or dub but is focused on meditative calm and spiritual reflection, far removed from the dance floor. Themes of nature worship and Eastern mysticism run deep in his music and - like the best new age - work brilliantly because they are not overstated or cloying.

artist:
Sinepearl

country of origin:
Sweden

style(s):
Psyambient, nature music, chillout, spacemusic

decades active:
2010's

essential releases:

  • The Dance Of Infinity (2011, Virtual)
  • Cycles Within Cycles Within (2014, Interchill Records)
  • Psithurism (2017, Bandcamp)

Reviewed by Mike G

Like the British psyambient duo Ishq, the music of Sinepearl aka Björn Ekegren dwells in the new age zone of ambient dance music - that is, ambience that has some roots in techno, trance, breaks and/or dub but is focused on meditative calm and spiritual reflection, far removed from the dance floor. Themes of nature worship and Eastern mysticism run deep in his music and - like the best new age - work brilliantly because they are not overstated or cloying. The artist's spiritually is simply there, unassuming, more of a wordless revelation or truth to be considered rather than a religion to be converted to.

Three Sinepearl albums are highly recommended. The spellbinding Cycles Within Cycles Within (2014) remains his masterpiece. This is his third album, nurtured and released by respected Canadian downtempo label Interchill Records. Like all the best psyambient it has an extraordinary lucidity, painting scenes of hyper-real places that seem carved out of three dimensional space. Ekegren skillfully morphs between landscaped ambient drones and subtle, melodic beat-driven chillout. The atmosphere is pastoral but otherworldly, the music built with glistening synthesised tones and rich textures. "Illusion Of Control" is a standout; a euphoric, minor-chord drone that slowly opens up like a beautiful flower, the stutters of a kickdrum only just perceptible beneath the surface.

His excellent debut album The Dance of Infinity (2011) is a little lighter and more playful than Cycles, and its melodies a little jazzier and looser, but it has that same strange lucidity. Psithurism (2017) is deeper and more drone-based than the other two, insomuch as there is often less activity happening on the music's gliding, slowly expanding surfaces. As an exercise in deep beatless spacemusic it's an absolutely stellar example of the form, morphing and breathing and billowing without ever losing its focus.

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