Djivan Gasparyan

Stephen Hill, host of the U.S. public radio program Music From The Hearts Of Space, was so impressed with I Will Not Be Sad In This World (1989) that he declared Gasparyan’s playing to be 'as sensitive and emotionally effecting as can be achieved by humans'.

artist:
Djivan Gasparyan

country of origin:
Armenia

style(s):
Armenian folk, ambient, world music

decades active:
1940's - 2010's

essential solo releases:

  • I Will Not Be Sad In This World (1989, Opal/All Saints)
  • Moon Shines At Night (1993, Gyroscope/All Saints)

Reviewed by Mike G

These two exceptional albums are by an Armenian musician who was discovered by Western audiences thanks to ambient pioneer Brian Eno, who encountered him while on a trip though old Soviet Union and Eastern Europe in the 1980's. Djivan Gasparyan - a veteran musician who who was already a hero in his home country - plays the dudak, a remarkable wind instrument with a warm resonance and very distinctive, slightly nasal tone. Stephen Hill, host of the U.S. public radio program Music From The Hearts Of Space, was so impressed with the debut album I Will Not Be Sad In This World (1989) that he declared Gasparyan’s playing to be "as sensitive and emotionally effecting as can be achieved by humans".

This really is music that can move one deeply, enhanced in spots by some lovely vocals sung by Gasparyan in his native tongue. The droning pieces are all steeped in a gentle melancholy, but sadness is rarely been more beautiful than this. While he has since guested on many albums by names as diverse Michael Brook and Lionel Richie, his subsequent solo albums mostly cover the same territory; these are the only two Gasparyan albums you need.

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